more than just another bike blog

Saturday, April 21, 2007

no, I'm not selling any oakleys

but someone hacked into my ebay account and posted 54 pair of oakleys for sale. they also changed my financial information and relocated me to Texas. can I just tell you what a pain in the ass it's been to delete each listing? and then I have to wait for ebay to decide to reimburse $113 in fees for these false listings.

I almost ignored the 54 emails I got about the postings but there was a nagging feeling in the back of my mind that said something was up, so I logged into my account and there they were. WFT!!!

okay, IT types, how did someone hack into my account?

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10 Comments:

At 4/22/2007 7:29 AM, Blogger lauren said...

holy moley!

one time our paypal account got hacked. they took all our info and then started charging stuff all over kingdom come.

good thing our bank figured it out fast and started denying charges.

apparently the theives sold our cc# on the internet. there were charges in russia, israel, the midwest and china. weird stuff.

 
At 4/22/2007 8:18 AM, Blogger Flandria said...

wow...

i got an email from a hacker once and the email template is just like PayPal, it alerted me that there was a charge of $350 on my account then asked me to click on the email so I can validate. When I clicked on the email it brought me to a page asking me to re-login, enter my credit card info etc - the page was mocked like PayPal...you shouldn't have to enter that info - it was a scam

I emailed Paypal and they verified that it was a scam and there was really no $350 charged. I logged into my account by opening a browser to check instead of clicking on the email. I changed my password etc.

Beware of these mocked websites, they really look like the real deal but make sure you check the URL and report immediately

you did the right thing...

 
At 4/22/2007 8:47 AM, Blogger velogirl said...

this wasn't a mock email or a mock website. someone logged into my ebay account and actually posted items for sale and changed my account informatin. luckily they didn't change my password (but I was smart enough to do that).

 
At 4/22/2007 8:54 AM, Blogger velogirl said...

BTW, I never click the URLs directly for something like this. with most browsers you can just roll over the URL and see where it will send you without even clicking on it. because I thought this was suspicious, I just logged into my ebay account through the front door -- not by clicking on the URL in the email (which looked legit, I guess because it was).

 
At 4/22/2007 10:20 AM, Blogger chatterbox said...

VG - they probably just used a password cracker to guess your password.

Good luck with the false charges. That is a huge bummer.

And, per Flandria's comment, never go phishing (the term for one of those emails that looks like it's from your bank or eBay, but is just a hacker trying to get your login).

 
At 4/22/2007 8:21 PM, Blogger alicat said...

ouch!
it's so annoying how the burden for fixing the stuff which the hackers broke all lies on your shoulders and takes forever. i hope getting your money back isn't too complicated.

 
At 4/23/2007 12:54 AM, Blogger shawnkielty said...

I think you have issue with Ebay -- that's not supposed to happen. ...

 
At 4/23/2007 11:41 AM, Blogger bbElf (a.k.a. panda) said...

That sucks! I am really anti-ebay and paypal right now; I'm still out several hundred dollars from the powertap fiasco & they don't appear to be doing anything to help recoup my losses. And heaven forbid they communicate with you at all...

I hope you're more successful at getting everything back in order.

 
At 4/23/2007 5:07 PM, Blogger JonathanQ said...

I was browsing through Ebay once, clicked on an item, and a screen came up asking me to log back into my Ebay account. Something about it just felt odd. I went back into Ebay through the front door, found the item again, clicked, got the same screen. Clicking on the item description redirected me to a fake Ebay login screen. Too slick...

A note about passwords, I used to run a password cracker a couple times a year on a system that I administered. It was surprisingly efficient. The most crack-proof passwords I have found so far are the first letters of the words of an easy-to-remember phrase that contains a few numbers. For example, "Tri-Flow Menlo Park Grand Prix 10 march 07" would become tfmpgp1m7, or something like that, though that one is a bit long. Makes a really difficult password to crack, and you only have to remember the phrase, not the password itself.

 
At 4/23/2007 8:21 PM, Blogger Sweet Cheeks said...

wow. my ebay life is going okay. now i am worried. thanks for the heads p on being vigilant!

 

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